How to Estimate your Body Fat Percentage

by Samie .


Master of Macros: http://www.thinkeatlift.com/master/
James Krieger’s articles: http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/?page_id=146
Mike Matthews’ video: https://youtu.be/RU8Wkgxfzf0

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The most popular methods for determining body fat percentage are: Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) devices (you know the scales that have a metal surface and you step on the barefoot or those devices you hold with your hands at the gym), Mathematical formulas such as the US Navy formula or the YMCA formula, and skinfold calipers. Some people also use Bod Pod, Hydrostatic Weighing, and DEXA but they are not common, so we’ll not discuss them here.

Although as a side note, if it’s convenient for you to get a DEXA scan, I recommend you do it. DEXA scans your entire body with X-rays and tells you very precisely how much fat you have. Then all the rest of your life you’ll have that DEXA scan as a reference point for your current body fat level.

Hydration status can also mess up with the readings of BIA. You could get very different body fat percentage readings in the same day just because of your hydrations status. So in conclusion BIA is not reliable, I don’t recommend you use it.
Skin Fold Calipers can be pretty accurate actually depending on the brand and if you use them correctly. There are brands that have you measure up to 6 points on your body and others only one place. They usually give different results.

But I think the biggest problem with these calipers is that most people don’t know how to use them. You have to grab just the right amount of skin every time – not too much and not too little, and always do it in the same places.

Again I think this can be learned with a bit of practice and you can get a result that’s within 1 percent of your real body fat percentage.

Here’s the interesting thing about your waist measurement: it goes up and down with your body fat percentage. For most people, not everybody but for most people, each body fat percentage has a certain corresponding waist measurement.

At 6 feet tall, 190lbs ripped is a very advanced level of muscle development. But this person has only been training for 6 months so there’s no way that they’re close to their genetic potential. This tells me right of the bat that they probably need to lose about 20lbs of fat to get to around 10%. I can almost guarantee it.

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